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Why YOU Should Support The Sifting Project

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Hello there! We’ve had quite a response to our new crowdfunding campaign! I am overwhelmed by the generosity of our supporters and want to thank each and every one of you.

I also want to get serious for a moment. A number of people have asked me, “why should I contribute to the Sifting Project? Aren’t there more important charities? Can’t I just share your videos and posts? Then other people will surely give!”

Look. There are a number of worthy causes out there. Even within archaeology, there is important research that needs to be funded all over the world. I talk a lot about the gifts on our website, but here is the truth. The Sifting Project has a special place in my heart because it has arisen against adversity for the sole purpose of trying to share the unknown, unexcavated history of the Temple Mount, one of the holiest places on earth to more than half the world’s population, with those exact people. So, in short, here is my answer.

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You should support our project because through us, you can ensure that facts, reality, and the heritage of all people who connect with the Temple Mount; Jews, Christians, and Muslims, is protected and shared. Ignorance feeds conflict and dispute, while knowledge helps us better understand our common past. I truly believe that having a better, more scientific understanding of the Temple Mount can only aid us in our path toward understanding and eventually peace.

The Temple Mount Sifting Project’s finds represent the first-ever archaeological data originating from within the Temple Mount because no proper excavation has ever been done there due to religious and political concerns. These concerns are valid. This is why the Sifting Project offers an amazing opportunity to archaeologically understand the history beneath the surface of the Temple Mount.

Our research has the ability to challenge theories, clarify understandings, and present the factual data about the history of the Temple Mount. We can undermine the Temple Denial movement; but only if our facts and research are shared with the scientific community and the public.

Our mission is to publish at least 3 volumes of our research on the Temple Mount’s history, special finds, coins, and pottery in 2018. We want our scientific research to encourage educated discussion on the history of the Temple Mount.

As a member of the global community, it is your responsibility to preserve this heritage. This is your chance to take part in revealing Jerusalem’s ancient past. You can ensure that facts, reality, and the heritage of all people who feel connected to the Temple Mount is protected and shared. This is why you should support the Sifting Project, but also why you should give toward our research.

For more information, see our crowdfunding website at half-shekel.org.

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Annual Appeal

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Check out our new video!

Dear friends,

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Artifacts from the Temple Mount

The story of the Temple Mount is the story of Jerusalem itself. A holy site to the three largest monotheistic religions, it is one of the most concentrated archaeological sites in the world. As you know, our finds here at The Temple Mount Sifting Project constitute the first-ever archaeological data originating from below the Temple Mount’s surface. Yet without being able to publish our research, it will be as if our 500,000 artifacts had never been found. Our research has the ability to challenge theories, clarify understandings, and present the factual data about the Temple Mount. We can undermine the Temple Denial Movement: but only if our facts and research are shared with the scientific community and the public.

Our mission is to publish at least 3 volumes of our research on the Temple Mount history, special finds, coins, and pottery in 2018. We want our scientific research to encourage educated discussion on the history of the Temple Mount.

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The Lab Staff  Says, “Join Us and Donate Today!”

slide1As 2017 approaches, we are faced with the reality of needing financial support to continue our research in the lab. With your help, our Annual Appeal will allow us to enter 2017 knowing that our focus can remain on our research and not on ways to raise money or cut the budget to keep the lights on. Our first goal is to fund the core research needed to fill the pages of our upcoming publication on the project, coins, and pottery. Once we’ve accomplished this task, our goal is to secure the minimum budget needed to keep our lab doors open.

This is the lab that gave you the reconstructed patterns of King Herod’s Temple Mount Courts, articles on figurines, Temple Denial, and other important research. Join our mission and help us progress with our research. Donate today and share this campaign with your friends and family because everyone should have the opportunity to support such an important project.

Donate Now at www.half-shekel.org

Thank you for your support. This project can not be completed without you.

Seasons greetings and much gratitude,

Dr. Gaby Barkay, Zachi Dvira, and the staff of the Temple Mount Sifting Project

Inspiring Supporters

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We love it when we inspire our supporters. We just got an email from Nancy in Washington who is a subscriber to the Biblical Archaeology Review. She said, “We have subscribed to BAR for many years! Imagine my surprise when my husband handed me the latest issue turned to page 58 and said “I have an idea for a quilt for you.” He was reading the article about the Temple Mount Floor tiles. There were three patterns used over and over again. I incorporated the 3 squares plus Herod’s Triangles around the edge. I made it to scale and used the colors found in the floor rubble from the Temple Mount in Jerusalem.”

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Nancy and her beautiful quilt

We are amazed at the detail and beautiful work that went into this quilt. As Frankie put it, Nancy “did an an amazing job of capturing the essence of Herod’s beautiful opus sectile floors.”

What is really interesting is how similar the quilt is to the floor created for the Israel Museum’s exhibit, “Herod the Great: The King’s Final Journey” that was on display in 2013.  The museum display was created from tiles that were found at Herodium, where Herod was buried, and from Cypros, a small Herodian palace on the ridge-line above Jericho.  Plaster replica tiles were then used to fill in the blank spaces.

Though the museum floor was not created from Temple Mount patterns or pieces, Nancy’s quilt is amazingly similar to the museum display! This shows how Herod used similar patterns and materials at these locations. This is how Frankie was able to use what she learned from Herodian, Banias, Cypros, Jericho, Masada and other patterns from the Roman world to reconstruct the patterns of the Temple Mount based on the pieces that were found in the sifting.

We are truly touched when we inspire our supporters. Please let us know if we’ve inspired you! Send us pictures and stories! Also, a special thanks goes out to Nancy for sharing her quilt with us. It is truly a work of art.

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